Tick Removal

With the Tick Bar you can remove ticks from humans and pets easily, quickly and safely. It is important to remove the tick as soon as possible. According to studies the risk of disease transmission increases considerably 24 hours after the tick bite. The risk is greatest 48 hours after the bite.

Removing the tick correctly is very important to prevent complications.

Easy removal of ticks using the Tick Bar:

  1. Clear the area around the tick.
  2. Place the fork of the Tick Bar against the skin.
  3. Slide the Tick Bar under the tick. Do not squeeze, crush, or puncture the body of the tick.
  4. Lift the tick carefully from the skin. Do not use a twisting or jerking motion.
  5. Desinfect the bite area and the Tick Bar.

Punkin poistaminen

IMPORTANT! Contact your physician if a circular rash larger than few centimeters develops around the bite.

Avoid incorrect removal methods

  • Do not use sharp pincers
    • you might accidentally puncture the tick.
  • Do not squeeze, crush or pierce the tick
    • squeezing the tick causes the intestinal contents of the tick to transfer to the skin.
  • Do not twist, bend or jerk the tick
    • the mouth parts might break off and cause a local inflammation in the skin.
    • "-- guidelines, including those of the World Health Organization and the United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention do not advise rotating the tick during removal." (Eurosurveillance)
  • Do not handle the tick with bare hands
    • microbes might get on your skin.
  • Do not try to suffocate the tick with oils or grease
    • the tick might vomit the intestinal contents to the skin.
  • Do not use heat or try to burn the tick
    • you might accidentally puncture the tick.

The instructions are based on advisories of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as international articles on tick removal (e.g. Gammons M and Salam G (2002). Tick removal. Am Fam Physician, 66(4): 643-647, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20020815/643.html).

Written by M.Sc. (Pharm.) Harri Eskelin and Ph.D. (Pharm.) Antti Alaranta.

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